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OLD-WORLD SOPHISTICATION

Beautiful suites with old-world feel await guests who want to be transported back to the glamour of yesteryears. You deserve nothing less than spacious dwellings adorned with big beds with plush sheets, carefully-selected antique pieces, and modern amenities. Enjoy the conveniences of free Wi-Fi internet, flat-screen TV with cable, room service, and daily housekeeping. Each suite has a private bathroom equipped with bathrobe, slippers, and hand-crafted soap and shampoo.
FIVE-STAR PAMPERING

We provide five-star service that will satisfy even the most discriminating of guests. Whether you’re staying for business or leisure, you will find our facilities and services more than satisfactory. Our front desk is ready to help you 24/7 and we have a concierge to tend to your special concerns. We have an outdoor pool, restaurant, bar/lounge, spa services, and meeting rooms that you can use during your stay. We also have shuttle services that can you to and from the airport.
IN THE HEART OF VIBRANT MERIDA

Convenience is a must of an enjoyable stay and our splendid location guarantees that. Just 10 minutes or less away from the places that matter in Merida, discovering the best of this vibrant city is an easy affair. Visit the Montejo House, Plaza Grande, and the museum by foot. For farther destinations, we can arrange transportation for your use.

About the Cathedral of San Ildefonso in Mérida

On the site of a former Maya temple is Mérida’s hulking, severe cathedral, begun in 1561 and completed in 1598. Some of the stone from the Maya temple was used in its construction. The massive crucifix behind the altar is Cristo de la Unidad (Christ of Unity), a symbol of reconciliation between those of Spanish and Maya heritage.

To the right over the south door is a painting of Tutul Xiu, cacique (indigenous chief) of the town of Maní paying his respects to his ally Francisco de Montejo at T’ho. (De Montejo and Xiu jointly defeated the Cocomes; Xiu converted to Christianity, and his descendants still live in Mérida.)


In the small chapel to the left of the altar is Mérida’s most famous religious artifact, a statue called Cristo de las Ampollas (Christ of the Blisters). Local legend says the statue was carved from a tree that was hit by lightning and burned for an entire night without charring. It is also said to be the only object to have survived the fiery destruction of the church in the town of Ichmul (though it was blackened and blistered from the heat). The statue was moved to the Mérida cathedral in 1645.

Other than these items, the cathedral’s interior is largely plain, its rich decoration having been stripped away by angry peasants at the height of anticlerical fervor during the Mexican Revolution.


1 comment:

Anonymous said...

The most beautiful cathedral I´ve ever seen, we were there a few months ago and it´s really impressive